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The Founder

I watched The Founder two times this year. The movie was a recommendation from a co-worker that spends so much time in airplanes he's seen the majority of the in-flight movies. So, I knew The Founder had to be good to stand out from all the other movies he's seen. Plus Michael Keaton is the lead actor. He's great.



For me the 2017 keyword was grit. I read Angela Duckworth's book, Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance, earlier in the year and as the year closes out The Founder sticks with me. As I approach 42, I guess I can begin to relate a bit to someone like Ray Kroc that didn't experience a great deal of career success until his 50's. Ray had flaws, but he also had grit.

Here's a small snippet from The Founder's final scene that I really enjoyed:


RAY KROC:
How the heck does an over-the-hill
52-year-old milkshake-machine
salesman build a fast-food empire
with 1,600 restaurants in 50 states
and five foreign countries, with
annual revenues in the neighborhood
of $700 million? It’s quite simple:
persistence.
He turns to the next card.
RAY KROC (CONT’D)
Nothing in the world can take the
place of good old persistence.
Talent won’t. Nothing’s more common
than unsuccessful men with talent.
Genius won’t. Unrecognized genius
is practically a clich√©.
His words have a familiar ring... They’re lifted straight
from “The Power Of The Positive” by Dr. Clarence Floyd Nelson
(the record from the beginning of the movie), with just a bit
of rephrasing to make it “his own”.
RAY KROC (CONT’D)
Education won’t. The world is full
of educated fools.
(MORE)
111.
RAY KROC (CONT’D)
Persistence and determination alone
are all-powerful.
He pauses a beat to let his words of wisdom sink in.
RAY KROC (CONT’D)
There’s no obstacle under the sun
that can’t be overcome with honest
hard work and determination. It’s
these core principles that enabled
me to rise to the top of the heap
at a point in life when most men
would be thinking about retirement.

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